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classism; conferences are actively bad 

Since this is on my mind now: in-person conferences are inherently classist and no amount of ~ inclusiveness ~ will change that. All the attendees are going to be people who can afford to travel (or whose employers will sponsor it, which is so correlated that it's not worth considering separately).

No, having an in-person conference and posting videos online doesn't count, because I know your next thing is going to be "but networking~" and that's just you admitting you want to meet fellow well-off people with the explicit goal of giving each other preferential treatment in the future. If you were doing it for the inclusiveness you'd just skip the conference part and post the thing online.

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily the ASF offers travel assistance. i used it once, and found out that of course, if you use it, you're automatically signed up as volunteer to help at the conference

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily This is eloquently summarized, thank you.

I would posit one way conferences have value: deaf related conferences. As deaf people in a hearing world, most of us don't interact with deaf people much day to day. The ability to gather with other deaf people is huge, and signed language doesn't work well on screens. Yes, there are people left out, it remains classist, but online versions are genuinely not the same.

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@meredith this makes sense and I'll readily concede this for things that really do make more sense in person.

What I'm really complaining about here is that everyone thinks *everything* makes more sense in person, just because that's the default, and then we get entire professional and academic conferences that should've been an email, and people are like "how do we get our conferences to stop being entirely middle-to-upper class white men?!"

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily Absolutely. I consider myself extremely lucky that I'm able to attend museum and history conferences, and I feel pained by the knowledge that people as deserving as I am aren't able to go.

I wish every conference that went virtual /hybrid in the past couple of years maintained the option whether or not in-person options happened; I'm glad AAMG is hybrid this year because my staff members can attend virtually since we only have budget for me to go.

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily It would be nice if scholarly societies would put resources into facilitating hundreds (thousands?) of local mini conferences that would enable anyone to network locally.

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily 100% agree.

classism; conferences are actively bad 

@emily I agree so much, but @netico won't :))

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